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Let’s Talk About Suicide

suicide

Today my husband Alex and I participated in a local walk for suicide prevention. One of my biggest realizations? Not many people want to talk about it. And not many people care about it until it’s too late.

I would like to be part of a movement which changes this. One that says, “Let’s talk about it. Let us understand it so we can do something about it.”

And so…

To all the people who have ever wanted to end their life:

The ones who think they’re a waste of space.
A lost cause.

To those who have given up on the world.
Who have lost hope.

You are not alone.

I was insane.
Maybe I still am.
But I’d rather be insanely honest with myself,
Than a liar.
I’d rather be me.

I’d rather tell you that thoughts of suicide still creep in from time to time.
Because it makes the truth and importance of my words much greater.
My voice is louder than the voices of the past.
My heart is stronger.
My mind is clearer.

There is hope.
There is help.
People might tell you you’re crazy,
But not nearly as often as you tell it to yourself.

Don’t believe the voice that says you don’t matter.
But don’t try to pretend it isn’t there.
Instead say proudly, “I hear you,
But I am not you.”

“You are just a part of me.
And yes you’re really loud.
And yes I know you want my attention.
I love you.”

All this part of you wants is love.
Acknowledgment.
A precious moment of silent sincerity.
In which all that is required is a sigh of relief.

We’ve got to take time to celebrate ourselves.
And each other.
And all the annoying details and differences in between.

I don’t know why people wait to celebrate others lives until they’re dead.

Find a reason to celebrate your life right now.

Journal time. Grab something to write with and on and…

Make a list of at least 20 things you love about your life.

 

Today, reach out to someone who might need some encouragement. Be an uplifter. And allow others to uplift you. When you allow others to help you, you help them feel good too.

It’s not about being perfect.

It’s about being you.

3 replies
  1. Sarah says:

    My aunt committed suicide when I was 18. It is so hard on those left behind. Her daughter is angry with her to this day. I don’t think people who do this have any idea what they are doing to the people who love them.

    Reply
    • Carrie Leigh Sandoval says:

      I’m sorry about your aunt, Sarah. Thank you for your comment. I agree that people don’t have any idea how it affects the people who love them. Most can’t see, feel or even imagine why anyone would love them. The thoughts often become so intense that they literally don’t have access to any good thoughts or memories. I feel like if people truly knew how loved they were, they wouldn’t want to hurt themselves. But that love has to come from within first.

      Reply

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